BLUEBIRD AUTOMOTIVE ELECTRIC MILK FLOATS

  And his Bluebird water and land speed record vehicles

 

 

MILK FLOATS

 

In British English, a milk float is a vehicle specifically designed for the delivery of fresh milk. Today, milk floats are usually battery electric vehicles (BEV), but they were formerly horse-drawn. They were once common in many European countries, particularly the United Kingdom, and were operated by local dairies. However, in recent years, as the number of supermarkets, small independent grocers and petrol stations stocking fresh milk has increased, most people have switched from regular home delivery to obtaining fresh milk from these other sources.

Characteristics

Because of the relatively small power output from its electric motor, a milk float travels fairly slowly, usually around 10 to 16 miles per hour (16 to 26 km/h) although some have been modified to do up to 80 mph (130 km/h). Operators often exit their vehicle before they have completely stopped to speed up deliveries; milk floats generally have sliding doors that can be left open when moving, or may have no doors at all. They are very quiet, suiting operations in residential areas during the early hours of the morning or during the night.

 

 

Chinese milk float imports, electric delivery van



Statistics

In August 1967 the UK Electric Vehicle Association put out a press release stating that Britain had more battery-electric vehicles on its roads than the rest of the world put together It is not clear what research the association had undertaken into the electric vehicle populations of other countries, but closer inspection disclosed that almost all of the battery driven vehicles licensed for UK road use were milk floats.

Glasgow has one of the largest working milk float fleets in the UK. Most of the vehicles operate from the Grandtully Depot in Kelvindale. Some dairies in the UK, including Dairy Crest, have had to modernise and have replaced their electric milk floats with petrol or diesel fuel-powered vehicles to speed up deliveries and thus increase profit.


Manufacturers

Manufacturers of milk floats in Britain in the 20th century included Smith's, Wales & Edwards, Osborne, Harbilt, Brush, Bedford and British Leyland. In 1941 Morrison Electrics standardised three types of body which would become the basis for thousands of milk floats built after the war to deliver goods to the recovering population. As of 2009, only Bluebird Automotive remain in the industry. See below.


Alternatives

Before BEVs, dairy supplies were delivered using horse-drawn milk floats. This lasted from the late 19th century until the 1950s. Today, with rounds expanding in coverage to ensure profitability in the face of falling levels of patronage, the limited range and speed of electric milk floats have resulted in many being replaced by diesel-powered converted vans.

 

Preservation

A collection of milk floats and other BEVs is kept by the Birmingham and Midland Motor Omnibus Trust at their museum, and in addition several milk floats are still in service today, albeit repurposed after their milk delivery days. Many are used for work in factories, or as pleasure vehicles in rural areas, and some are hired out to make money for film, pr and events.

 

 

BLUEBIRD AUTOMOTIVE

 

Bluebird Automotive revealed that their Chinese milk floats are in the final stages of development. The BE-1 electric 3.5t chassis cab is ready for production, which should begin in a couple of months time.

 

These carts have been engineered by the same team responsible for the electric Bluebirds planning attempts on the world land and water speed records. The BE-1 is far more prosaic. It is a practical, no-frills lead acid gel battery-powered load-shifter with a starting price of £24,995 and a bodywork/payload potential of 1,700kg.

Battery modules are housed in pods running down each side of the ladder frame chassis, designed to be removed and replaced within a few minutes. The prototype features a 6kW motor driving the rear wheels via a five-speed manual gearbox and its 12-strong battery pack can propel it to 30mph and endows it with a range of around 40 miles.

Energy and motor requirements can be tailored to operational needs and thereís already a 9kW option in the pipeline capable of 40mph. Additional batteries can be housed centrally underneath the chassis to increase the range potential if necessary. Thatís the beauty of this relatively low-cost electric CV; itís very adaptable depending on the operational duty cycle.

Bluebird has teamed up with a Chinese electric vehicle manufacturer for production of the basic chassis cab with final assembly taking place in Wales. In the spirit of reciprocation it will be assembling and distributing vehicles like golf carts in Europe for its Chinese partner. Sales forecasts for BE-1 are modest at 150 for 2012, rising to around 1,000 by 2015.

As expected the prototype VansA2Z drove briefly was pretty rough and ready, but we like the thinking. Itís payload potential combined with low running costs, relatively cheap batteries to replace and a sensible up-front cost mean that the BE-1 is worth taking seriously. We look forward to trying out the finished product. Itís ideal for local urban high-payload deliveries on set routes, so donít be surprised if the milkman turns up in one in the not too distant future.

 

 

 


EV Innovations Limited
The Bluebird Centre
The Old Market
Melville Street
Pembroke Dock
Pembrokeshire
SA72 6XR
UNITED KINGDOM
Telephone: 0845 456 0571

Company Registration Number 07918747

 

 

COMPANIES HOUSE WEBCHECK

 

 

Name & Registered Office:


BLUEBIRD PERFORMANCE ENGINEERING LIMITED
4 HARGRAVE CLOSE
BINLEY
COVENTRY
WEST MIDLANDS
CV3 2XS
Company No. 07918747


Status: Active
Date of Incorporation: 20/01/2012

Country of Origin: United Kingdom
Company Type: Private Limited Company
Nature of Business (SIC):
82990 - Other business support service activities not elsewhere classified
Accounting Reference Date: 31/01
Last Accounts Made Up To:  (NO ACCOUNTS FILED)
Next Accounts Due: 20/10/2013
Last Return Made Up To: 20/01/2013
Next Return Due: 17/02/2014
Mortgage: Number of charges: ( 0 outstanding / 0 satisfied / 0 part satisfied )
Last Members List
: 20/01/2013
Previous Names:
Date of change Previous Name
22/10/2012 EV INNOVATIONS LIMITED

 

 

 

 

 

LINKS:

 

Martin Rees

Bluebird Performance Engineering

Bluebird-BE-1-readied-for-production

Bluebird Automotive

EV Iinnovations

http://www.companieshouse.gov.uk//contact/contactUs.shtml

http://uk.linkedin.com/pub/martin-rees/6/805/a4b

http://www.bluebirdperformanceengineering.com/

http://www.ecovansa2z.com/Bluebird-BE-1-readied-for-production

http://www.bluebirdautomotive.com/

http://www.evinnovations.co.uk/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NOTE: The Bluebird Automotive milk floats, termed BE1, have no connection with the original BE1 electric land speed record car from 1996/7, nor the Blueplanet BE3 electric land speed record project. Nor is Bluebird Automotive licensed to use the blue bird logo seen at the foot of this page (nor the head of other pages on this site), which is preserved exclusively for vehicles using the patent Bluebird battery-cartridge exchange refueling system. The same applies to vehicle parts as per the applicable trademarks cited on this website, which are available for inspection at the UK Intellectual Property Office (IPO).

 

FRAUD: It is an offence for any company to use protected names or symbols on their goods such as to constitute counterfeit goods. While Bluebird Automotive may at present call this vehicle 'Bluebird', we are given to understand from documents provided to us by third parties that other trademarks not belonging to Bluebird Automotive are the subject of ongoing investigation for fraudulent misrepresentation and/or probable breach of an applicant's duty of trust as trustees. We shall report back on this as soon as we find out more. Clearly though, the use by Bluebird Automotive of a blue colored 'bird' logo on their website, purporting to be under license, is a matter for concern, where as far as we know no such license exists. This matter has been reported to the proper authorities for investigation.

 

IP CRIME

 

Best practice

 

The Intellectual Property Office and its partners have undertaken a wide variety of awareness raising activities for industry, enforcement officers and consumers to highlight the threat posed by IP crime. We have also developed a number of information products, events and contacts for the enforcement community.

 

IP crime group

 

Founded by the Intellectual Property Office in 2004, the purpose of the IP crime group is to bring together Government, enforcement agencies and industry groups to ensure a collaborative approach in addressing IP crime issues.

 

IP crime report

 

The main aim of the IP crime report is to establish an accurate measurement of IP crime within the United Kingdom.

 

Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA)

 

The Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA) seeks to coordinate international cooperation on IPR enforcement practices, to tackle effectively counterfeit and pirated goods. It is an agreement currently being negotiated by a number of countries that include the USA, Japan, Canada, Australia, New Zealand and the United Kingdom as part of the European Union.

 

 

Fraud Hotline:  Email John Campbell

 

+44 (0) 1323 831727

+44 (0) 7842 607865

 

TRADE MARKS ACT 1994 - Guide to offences

S92 - Unauthorised use of a trade mark

 

 

Offence

Section

Sentence

Indictment

(1) A person commits an offence who with a view to gain for himself or another, or with intent to cause loss to another, and without the consent of the proprietor -

(a) applies to goods of their packaging a sign identical to, or likely to be mistaken for, a registered trade mark, or

(b)sells or lets for hire, offers or exposes for sale or hire or distributed goods which bear, or the packaging of which bears, such a sign, or

(c) has in his possession, custody or control in the course of a business any such goods with a view to the doing of anything, by himself or another, which would be an offence under paragraph (b)

92(1)

6 months and/or a £5,000 fine.

10 years and/or a fine.

(2) A person commits an offence who with a view to gain for himself or another, or with intent to cause loss to another, and without the consent of the proprietor -

(a) applies a sign identical to, or likely to be mistaken for, a registered a trade mark to material intended to be used -
    (i) for labelling or packaging goods,
    (ii) as a business paper in relation to goods, or
    (iii) for advertising goods, or

(b) uses in the course of a business material bearing such a sign for labelling or packaging goods, as a business paper in relation to goods, or for advertising goods, or

(c) has in his possession, custody or control in the course of a business any such material with a view to the doing of anything, by himself or another, which would be an offence under paragraph (b)

92(2)

6 months and/or a £5,000 fine.

10 years and/or a fine.

3) A person commits an offence who with a view to gain for himself or another, or with intent to cause loss to another, and without the consent of the proprietor -

(a) makes an article specifically designed or adapted for making copies of a sign identical to, or likely to be mistaken for, a registered trade mark, or

(b) has such an article in his possession, custody or control in the course of a business,

Knowing or having reason to believe that is has been, or is to be, used to produce goods, or material for labelling or packaging goods, as a business paper in relation to goods, or for advertising goods

92(3)

6 months and/or a £5,000 fine.

10 years

 

 

 

FRAUD ACT 2006 - Guide to offences

 

S2 Fraud by false representation

 

 

Offence Section Sentence Indictment
(1) A person is in breach of this section if he-

(a) dishonestly makes a false representation, and

(b) intends, by making the representation
    (i) to make a gain for himself or another, or
    (ii) to cause loss to another or to expose another to a risk of loss.


(2) A representation is false if

(a) it is untrue or misleading, and

(b) the person making it knows that it is, or might be, untrue or misleading.


(3) ďRepresentationĒ means any representation as to fact or law, including a representation as to the state of mind of-

(a) the person making the representation, or

(b) any other person.


(4) A representation may be express or implied.


(5) For the purposes of this section a representation may be regarded as made if it
(or anything implying it) is submitted in any form to any system or device designed to receive, convey or respond to communications (with or without human intervention).
2 not exceeding 12 months* and/or a £5,000 fine. 10 years and/or a fine.


 

S6 Possession of any article(s) for use in the course of or in connection with any fraud

 

Guide to offences under the fraud act 2006, section 6, possession of any article(s) for use in the course of or in connection with any fraud. Read across a row to find the type of offence, the section of the act it relates to, the sentence and the indictment.
Offence Section Sentence Indictment
(1) A person is guilty of an offence if he has in his possession or under his control any article for use in the course of or in connection with any fraud.


(2) A person guilty of an offence under this section is liable

(a) on summary conviction, to imprisonment for a term not exceeding 12 months or to a fine not exceeding the statutory maximum (or to both);

(b) on conviction on indictment, to imprisonment for a term not exceeding 5 years or to a fine (or to both).


(3) Subsection (2)(a) applies in relation to Northern Ireland as if the reference to 12 months were a reference to 6 months.
6 not exceeding 12 months* and/or a £5,000 fine. 5 years and/or a fine.


 
S7 Making or supplying articles for use in fraud

 

Guide to offences under the fraud act 2006, section 7, making or supplying articles for use in fraud. Read across a row to find the type of offence, the section of the act it relates to, the sentence and the indictment.
Offence Section Sentence Indictment
(1) A person is guilty of an offence if he makes, adapts, supplies or offers to supply
any article-

(a) knowing that it is designed or adapted for use in the course of or in connection with fraud, or

(b) intending it to be used to commit, or assist in the commission of, fraud.


(2) A person guilty of an offence under this section is liable

(a) on summary conviction, to imprisonment for a term not exceeding 12 months or to a fine not exceeding the statutory maximum (or to both);

(b) on conviction on indictment, to imprisonment for a term not exceeding 10 years or to a fine (or to both).


(3) Subsection (2)(a) applies in relation to Northern Ireland as if the reference to 12 months were a reference to 6 months.
7 not exceeding 12 months* and/or a £5,000 fine. 10 years and/

 

 

 

 

  

 

This website is Copyright © 2014 Bluebird Marine Systems Ltd.   The names Bluebird, Bluefish, Ecostar DC50ô, Utopia Tristarô and the blue bird in flight Bluebird trademark legend, blue bird in flight logo logo are  trademarks. All other trademarks are hereby acknowledged. The color blue is a protected element of the mark..