PLANETARY SPACE EXPLORATION - LOCOMOTION

ADVANCED ROBOTS ARE ESSENTIAL FOR LOCOMOTION OVER IRREGULAR PLANETARY SURFACES FOR EXPLORATION

 

 ANTICS - ARDUINO - ARMOUR - ARTWORK - BIOLOGY - BLACK BOX - COMPUTERS - ELECTRONICS - ENERGY - FRAME

 FORMICARIUM - HEAD - JAWS - JIMMY WATSON - KITS - LEGSMECHANICS - MOTORS - MOVIE  - PHOTOGRAPHY - RASPBERRY Pi R/C DRONE - SENTRY SOFTWARE - SOUND PROOFING - SPACE ROVERS - SPEED - SUSPENSION - TAIL - WEAPONS - WARGAMING

 

 

SPACE-27-TEC-2020 RESEARCH CLUSTER EU FUNDING CALL FOR PROPOSALS

 

H2020 SRC - Space exploration funding from the European Commission is via calls for proposals and tender opportunities such as that above.

 

 

Space exploration is fraught with obstacles, not least of which is locomotion over uneven terrain. Moon, Lunar, or Mars Rovers have been trundling over the surfaces of planets using wheels and tracks with a degree of success. The limitations are when encountering obstacles such as craters and gullies that they cannot negotiate due to traction difficulties.

 

Humans are reasonably adept at overcoming difficult to climb obstacles such as cliffs and trees, but nowhere near as agile as cats, monkeys, squirrels, insects or spiders.

 

For a Space Rover to be effective in craters and canyons wheels might not provide the ideal level of traction over rocks and up steep inclines. Whereas, a stable legged vehicle with suitable ground clearance and versatile feet, might scramble up slopes and even traverse cliff faces - greatly increasing the possibilities when exploring a planet's surface.

 

 

 

PROTOTYPE - This was the 1st tubular frame made of recycled steel, where previous chassis had been unitary construction. This design has since been improved on, to be mocked up and tested in steel before making a final version in titanium and/or composites.


 

SPACE RESEARCH CLUSTER (SRC) SPACE-27-TEC-2020 - EUROPEAN COMMISSION

 

The overall challenge of this Strategic Research Cluster (SRC) is to enable major advances in space robotic technologies for future on-orbit missions requiring robotic activity and proximity rendezvous, and the exploration of the surfaces of the other bodies in our solar system.

The first activities in the SRC have addressed designing, manufacturing and testing of reliable and high performance robotic Common Building Blocks for operation in space environments (orbital and/or planetary). The specific challenge of the second call was to integrate the previously prepared Common Building Blocks into demonstrators on ground, towards applications of space robotics in the field of orbital and planetary use. These robotics applications address the future needs of exploration (advanced autonomy and robot cooperation relying on AI and other techniques) and commercial exploitation of space (on-orbit servicing, in-orbit assembly and reconfigurable satellites).

 

The objective of this third call is to prepare the technologies for demonstrators planned to be implemented in the 2023-2027 timeframe. The successful proposals shall validate relevant applications for both orbital and planetary scenarios relying on technologies derived from previous SRC activities.

Advanced Robotics Planetary Exploration: the next step in exploration will target areas of planets that are hard to reach, such as gullies, cliffs, craters and lava tubes. This requires improved capability in the rover’s understanding of its environment (not simply 2D with obstacles, but fully 3D), and capabilities in motion planning and execution which have not previously been demonstrated.

 

This sub-topic aims to integrate the state-of-the-art technology (artificial intelligence, sensing and modelling complex environments, diverse means of locomotion, and cooperative planning and decision making) needed for this application.

 

The successful proposal should aim to overcome these current constraints by identifying the gaps in technology and knowledge and providing innovative solutions.

 

In detail, the successful proposal should address the following aspects:

 

Demonstrator: the design and implementation of an exploration demonstrator to simulate hazardous and/or difficult extra-terrestrial terrain and test the technologies required to plan, navigate, traverse and investigate them.

 

Technology development: Identification and development/maturation of the critical software and/or hardware technologies needed to enable the exploration of previously inaccessible areas on planetary surfaces. The spin-in of technologies from terrestrial sectors shall be investigated for this purpose.

 

Case Study exploring terrestrial exploitation: provision a full case study demonstrating how the submitted technology can be exploited on Earth to solve problems in terrestrial sectors and scenarios.

 

Re-use and improvement of the technologies and products of the previous SRC Calls: inclusion of a dedicated section explaining how to implement and develop the results of the previous SRC Calls, both in terms of building blocks and of system design.

 

The results of the successful project, coupled with the results of the previous SRC calls, will be crucial in paving the way for future European activities in planetary exploration.

One proposal will be selected for surface exploration.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of around €3 million EUR would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

A guidance document will be made available on the Funding & Tenders Portal.

 

Grants awarded under this topic will be complementary to each other and complementary to grants awarded under other previous SRC topics COMPET-4-2014, COMPET-4-2016 and SPACE-12-TEC-2018. In order to ensure a smooth and successful implementation of this Strategic Research Cluster, the beneficiaries of complementary grants ("complementary beneficiaries") shall join the already established "collaboration agreement". The respective options of Article 2, Article 31.6 and Article 41.4 2 of the Model Grant Agreement will be applied.

 

Proposals under this topic may be subject to security scrutiny if they could potentially lead to security-sensitive results that should be classified (see guide for classification available at the Funding & Tenders Portal).

Expected Impact:

Space robotics technologies developed under these sub-topics are expected to increase the performance of space missions in a cost-effective manner and enable new business cases considering New Space approaches.

The results are expected to:

 

Propose multiple new business cases and enable new market opportunities reflected by the paradigm shift from mission-specific solutions to modular, intelligent, flexible spacecraft;

Increase the viability of the demonstrator(s) through the necessary hardware developments;

Provide a qualitative and quantitative evaluation of the economical, technical, scientific and performance-related impact and benefits of standardized technologies, in order to tangibly contribute towards emerging regulations governing the commercial use of such technologies in space.

Additionally, the results are expected to:

- Improve the scientific yield of planetary missions by increasing accessibility;
- Lead to mission studies for challenging, next-generation planetary exploration;
- Lead to tangible exploitation of planetary exploration technologies in terrestrial applications.

     

 

  

 

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SPACE RESEARCH FUNDING

 

EU space research aims to foster a cost-effective, competitive, and innovate space industry and research community. This helps ensure that space technology meets EU policies and provides cutting-edge solutions to everyday societal problems that benefit EU citizens. It also ensures that Europe remains competitive in space.

 

EU space research is supported through framework programmes. Horizon 2020 is the current framework programme covering the period from 2014 to 2020. It was preceded by FP7 which ran from 2007 to 2013, and FP6 which ran from 2002 to 2006. The support of these programmes is critical to the ongoing development of the space sector. In particular:

 

* It encourages the research community and the private sector to intensify their efforts in the space sector and boost investment;

 

* It helps to sustain a competitive space industry including manufacturers, service providers, and operators;

 

* It provides the services and infrastructure necessary for the development and exploitation of new technologies.

 

Specific actions are often carried out in cooperation with the research activities of EU countries and the European Space Agency (ESA).

 

Over EUR 1.4 billion will be devoted to Horizon 2020 to support Europe’s competitiveness in space research.

 

 

SPACE & SECURITY RESEARCH FUNDING

EU space research aims to foster a cost-effective, competitive, and innovate space industry and research community. This helps ensure that space technology meets EU policies and provides cutting-edge solutions to everyday societal problems that benefit EU citizens. It also ensures that Europe remains competitive in space.

 

EU space research is supported through framework programmes. Horizon 2020 is the current framework programme covering the period from 2014 to 2020. It was preceded by FP7 which ran from 2007 to 2013, and FP6 which ran from 2002 to 2006. The support of these programmes is critical to the ongoing development of the space sector. In particular:

- It encourages the research community and the private sector to intensify their efforts in the space sector and boost investment;

 

- It helps to sustain a competitive space industry including manufacturers, service providers, and operators;

 

- It provides the services and infrastructure necessary for the development and exploitation of new technologies.

 

Specific actions are often carried out in cooperation with the research activities of EU countries and the European Space Agency (ESA).

 

Over EUR 1.4 billion will be devoted to Horizon 2020 to support Europe’s competitiveness in space research.



SECURITY FROM SPACE

Security forms an integral part of European Space Policy. Space-based assets and systems are critical to ensuring security on Earth (security from space). At the same time, these assets need to be protected in the difficult environment of outer space (security of space). Most space technology, infrastructure, and services can serve both civilian and military objectives. They can therefore contribute to the development of an innovative and competitive European Defence Technological and Industrial Base (EDTIB).

 

Space-based systems are making an increasingly important contribution to European security and to the EU’s Common Security and Defence Policy (CSDP). Europe faces constantly evolving security threats that are more diverse, less visible, and less predictable than before. To deal with them, it needs the best affordable capabilities for autonomous political assessment, sound decision-making, prevention policies, and effective action. Space assets provide a significant contribution to confronting these threats through their global monitoring, communication, and positioning capabilities. For instance:

 

Copernicus

 

The European Earth Observation Programme Copernicus improves emergency response, global stability, and homeland security by contributing to maritime surveillance, border control, and global food security.

 

Galileo

 

The Galileo navigation satellite system will facilitate civil protection operations in harsh environments, speed up rescue operations for people in distress, and provide tools for coastguards and border control authorities. It will also enable new security-related applications that can help locate stolen property or lost pets and individuals.

 

GOVSATCOM

 

The European Commission has proposed a new governmental satellite communications initiative (GOVSATCOM). Situated at the crossroads of space, security and defence, this initiative contributes to important political priorities, specifically: “A safe and secure Europe”, “A Union that protects”, “A stronger Europe on the global scene”, and “Strengthening common security and defence”. It will be one of four components of the next EU Space Programme Regulation, and was defined based on an Impact Assessment.

 

The objective is to provide reliable, secure, and cost-effective satellite communication services for EU and national public authorities managing security critical missions and infrastructure. Users will include a wide range of security actors, including border guards, police, defence actors, civil protection, as well as diplomatic services in EU countries and in EU Institutions and Agencies. The European Parliament has approved a Preparatory Action for GOVSATCOM with a total budget of €10 million. The purpose is to implement various actions with users, industry, and satellite communication providers in 2019-2020, which are needed for the successful start of GOVSATCOM operations during the EU's next long-term budget (2021-2027).

 

 

SECURITY OF SPACE

 

Space-based products and services rely on satellites which must be monitored and protected against threats to ensure a safe and uninterrupted service. At the same time, people on Earth must be also be protected against space hazards such as asteroid strikes. Being informed about the situation in space is referred to as Space Situational Awareness (SSA). It covers three main themes:

 

- Space debris (SST)
- Space weather phenomena
- Near-Earth Objects


SPACE DEBRIS

pace debris is manmade defunct material orbiting the Earth, such as spent rocket stages from launch activities and obsolete satellites. It represents a growing threat to European space activities as an object of 1cm in length or greater can damage or even destroy a satellite. By 2020, there is expected to be around a million of these objects in orbit.

 

To mitigate the risk of collisions, it is necessary to identify and monitor satellites and space debris. This activity is known as Space Surveillance and Tracking (SST) and is mostly based on ground-based sensors such as telescopes and military radar coupled with processing facilities.

 

At the moment, satellite and launch operations are dependent on US data for anti-collision alerts. However, the EU has adopted a Decision to establish a Space Surveillance and Tracking (SST) Support Framework. This supports the networking and operations of SST assets owned by some EU countries, as well as the EU Satellite Centre, in order to provide SST services to all EU countries, EU institutions, spacecraft owners and operators, and civil protection authorities. EU SST services assess the risk of in-orbit collisions; detect and characterise in-orbit fragmentations, break-ups, or collisions; and assess the risk of uncontrolled re-entry of space debris into the Earth's atmosphere.

 

In application of Article 7.4 of Decision No 541/2014/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council of 16 April establishing a Framework for Space Surveillance and Tracking Support (SST), the Commission is publishing the list of EU countries participating in the SST Support Framework as of 11 June 2015. They are:

 

France
Germany
Italy
Spain

 

From 8 November 2018, the following countries also began to participate:

 

Poland
Portugal
Romania

 

This participation is the result of individual applications submitted by each country and of the positive assessment of these applications by the Commission on the basis of Article 13 of the Commission Implementing Decision of 12 September 2014 on the Procedure for Participation of the Member States in the Space Surveillance and Tracking Support Framework (C(2014) 6342 final), against the criteria set out in this Implementing Decision, as well as the Commission Implementing Decision of 19 December 2016 on a coordination plan for the space surveillance and tracking support framework and on the procedure for the participation of Member States, (C(2016) 8482).

 

Space weather phenomena and Near-Earth Objects (NEOs)

 

Space weather phenomena include changes to Earth’s magnetic field, radiation from solar winds, 'space storms' made of particles, or electromagnetic radiation. These events can cause major instrument failures on satellites. They can also severely damage ground-based systems such as electrical power grids, leading to blackouts and significant economic damage.

 

Near-Earth Objects (NEOs) are asteroids or comets that come close to Earth, some of which have the potential to be a hazard to the planet.

 

Space weather phenomena and NEOs are addressed in a number of research projects funded under the Space themes of the EU's Framework Programmes for Research FP7 and Horizon 2020. The ESA also undertakes research and development activities in its own SSA programme.

 

 

LINKS & REFERENCE

 

European Space Surveillance and Tracking

European Sapce Surveillance and Tracking Service Provision Portal

European External Action Service

European Security and Defence Policy

European Defence Agency (73 kB)

European Satellite Centre

European Space Agency

 

 

 

BREXIT NOTICE - General notice for UK applicants: In conformity with the EU-UK Withdrawal Agreement*, the UK and persons or entities established in the UK continue to be eligible to receive Union funds under actions carried out in direct, indirect or shared management, which implement Union programmes and activities committed under the MFF 2014-2020 until the closure of those Union programmes and activities. Restrictions may, however, apply for security-related reasons or concerning financial instruments. When such restrictions apply, these will be clearly specified in the call for proposals.

 

 

 

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LINKS & REFERENCE

 

https://ec.europa.eu/info/funding-tenders/opportunities/portal/screen/opportunities/topic-details/space-27-tec-2020

 

 

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ANTICS - ARDUINO - ARMOUR - ARTWORK - BIOLOGY - BLACK BOX - COMPUTERS - ELECTRONICS - ENERGY - FRAME - HEAD - JAWS - JIMMY WATSON - KITS - LEGSMECHANICS - MOTORS - MOVIE  - PHOTOGRAPHY - RASPBERRY Pi - R/C DRONE - SENTRY - SOFTWARE - SOUND PROOFING - SPEED - SUSPENSION - TAIL - WEAPONS - WARGAMING

 

DINOSAURS - DOLPHINS - HUMANOIDS - RAYS - SHARKS - WHALES

 

ARDUINO - ARM HOLDINGS  - BEAGLEBOARD - MBED - PCBS - PICAXE - RASPBERRY PI 

 

 

A serious hard case, giant ants from Australia

 

ALIEN LIFE FORM - If there were inhabitants on other worlds, space exploration vehicles might be seen as aliens.

 

 

 

 

This website is Copyright © 2020 Bluebird Marine Systems Limited.   The design of the Robot Hexapod on this page is design copyright © December 15 2015, all rights reserved - Jameson Hunter Ltd. IMPORTANT NOTE:  Under no circumstances may our products, or those of Jameson Hunter Ltd, be used by any military or law enforcement organization, for any warlike, combat, or peacekeeping crowd control purposes. Anyone purchasing one of these units will be required to sign a binding undertaking (Deed) to that effect. Any unit found to have been purchased by proxy, will be confiscated, along with civil remedy in respect of breach of contract, that all parties in the chain will be vicariously liable for - to include damages for vehicles developed from our designs without our consent - and possible fraud issue from the deception. In addition to copyright theft, the law of passing-off applies.